My interview with DMC World magazine

Hey Dave welcome back to DMCWORLD, where on planet earth are you today?
Hello. Thanks. Always a pleasure, never a chore :-) I’m at home. Just got back from DJing in Seoul and Manila this weekend so I’m just unpacking, doing the washing, getting ready to do the school run, etc. It’s not all glamour you know!

Right let’s get into it, a brand new tune ‘Naughty Forest’ you have created with Funkagenda that already has the likes of Pig & Dan, Nic Fanciulli and Stephan Bodzin jumping through hoops over. Talk us through the track…
It began as an idea after Adam (Funkagenda) and I did a gig together a couple of years ago in Jordan. He’d mentioned the idea of using the vocal sample before so as we DJ’ed together we talked about what we liked about certain parts of some of the tracks we were playing. So when he got on the flight home, he threw together some of those ideas in a rough demo. Then we tried to get together a few times to work on it but never seemed to be able to get our diaries to align so in the end he sent me all the parts and I did my own version which is what has just come out.

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There’s also two remixes sending us deeper courtesy of Dapayk and Nicolas Masseyeff, why were these two excellent producers picked for rework duties?

Because I’m huge fans of both. Plain and simple. I’d been wanting them to do something for me and my label Selador for a while but this was the one I thought that they could really get their teeth into. Luckliy, they agreed and did fantastic jobs, both of them.

2013 saw you release the beautiful ‘The Holy Ghost’ track on US based Tulipa Recordings. This year you have opened the door for budding producers from around the world to remix the tune with the winner’s mix being included in the summer remix package alongside D-Nox & Beckers and Dousk.

http://www.djdaveseaman.com/tulipa-recordings-presents-dave-seaman-the-holy-ghost-remix-competition/
It’s another great idea…even if people entering do have to purchase the track before getting to grips with their mix – who has the job of choosing the winner and whose initial idea was it?
The idea came from Tulipa. It’s not a new idea but I think it’s a great way for new producers to get noticed. And I always remember that I got my big break in the industry through a competition so it’s nice to give others an similar opportunity. I’m going to be listening to all the entries myself and choose the winner. Looking forward to hearing them.

It has been a year since you released your mix album on Kickstarter, you were ahead of the game yet again as other producers have followed suit releasing music through this pledging avenue…DMCWORLD Champion QBert being the latest big name to bring something out. So now that the dust has settled what are your thoughts on the whole experience. Is it something you would do again?
It was an exciting adventure as most journeys into the unknown are. Treading new ground and being out of my comfort zone breathed new life into a process I’ve done dozens of times before. I’d certainly do it again and can see it becoming a much more common way of artists making their projects happen. With the advent of social media, that direct line between the artist and their audience opens up hinge possibilities that just weren’t possible before through traditional methods.
It’s the future. Garlic bread is so last year ;-)

What was the killer track you had to remove from the album lastminute.com as it was too early for the label and their release plans?
It was the Dixon remix of Mano Le Tough’s ‘Everything You”ve Done Before’. One of my favourite tracks from last year that also dovetailed perfectly with the two tracks either side of it. The label, Permanent Vacation, thought it was too early for them to agree for it to go on the album as they hadn’t even set a release date and plead with them as I might, I couldn’t twist their arm. Ironically, just after I’d finished the album, they changed their minds and brought their release forward but it was too late. It actually came out the same week as my album! Gutted.

What is coming out next from your label Selador Recordings…
After ‘Naughty Forest’ we will have a Selador Showcase, a selection of ten tracks from various artists and will musically range from deeper stuff of Samu.l to more peak time stuff from Marc Marzenit. It’s basically like a full DJ set of music in one collection! Also on the label in the future will be another track from myself, a new release from the labels’ co owner Steve Parry and new EP’s from Robert Babicz and AFFKT.
It’s going to be a big year for the label.

Okay, the name Selador. Has it reference to a psychoanalyst in Frank Herbert’s ‘The Santaroga Barrier’, the Portuguese for ‘sealer’ or is it a plain old spelling mistake and it should have said Cellar Door???
Ha! Yes it’s derived from Cellar Door. Taken from the film Donnie Darko where Drew Barrymore’s character talks about how it is the most beautiful sounding combination of words in the English language. It seemed fitting as we believe we are in the business of beautiful sounds :-)

I hear you had a great time at the basketball in America watching Miami Heat beat the Chicago Bulls. Now come on Garforth lad, was it as good as watching a classic West Yorkshire derby between Leeds and Huddersfield Town?
Ha! Nothing beats the 5-1 thrashing of Huddersfield at Elland Road recently. Especially as we were 1-0 down to start with. I took my young boys to that one. Unfortunately I laos took them a few weeks later when we lost 5-1 to Bolton. You win some, you lose some. But I have to admit Leeds United to learn a thing or two about the razzmatazz of the NBA. It was all going off, the fireworks, the dancing girls, the DJ hyping the crowd. I tell you one thing that I boy from Leeds couldn’t get his head around though… £50 a head for the half time buffet!!! Give me a pint and a pie for £6 anytime!!

If someone ever opened up a dance music museum there would be one definite piece of memorabilia in there, something you found in a dusty cardboard box in your loft; your notepad containing your Kylie Minogue ‘Confide In Me’ lyrics. Can you recall that time writing those words which millions around the world now know and love, how long did that song in particular take to write…and what are you going to do with the notepad?
I do remember writing them yes. That song came together so quickly. Steve and I threw together a backing track in a couple of hours one afternoon and that evening I went home and wrote the lyrics. The next day Kylie came in and recorded it and that original demo vocal is pretty much what was released. Creativity is always best when it just flows out of you without having to think or work too hard. As for what I’m going to do with the original hand written lyrics? I’ll probably frame them and stick it up in the loo for a little contemplative reading whilst sitting on the throne :-)

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I loved something you said last year when discussing dance music’s biggest problem at the moment is that too much music is being made with no filter system; “Imagine if everyone who thought they could cook were allowed to put their product on the shelves of a supermarket. It would take you a week just to get past the cereals!” So what is the solution?

There isn’t an easy one. Unless the digital sites start being more selective about what tracks they take on, which goes against the whole Chris Anderson ‘Long Tail’ model of digital retail. But I think if some online platforms began to specialise and became known for specific genres they probably would have great success doing so. Beatport are bringing in new rules where you have to submit how many Facebook likes, Twitter followers, mailing list numbers, etc you have. And you have to have a certain number to have your track accepted for sale on Beatport. Which is all well and good in theory. But we all know that those numbers are easy to manipulate. I think it just encourages people to buy “likes”. So it’s not necessarily a way to keep quality standards high.

You were one of the first British DJs to start touring the world, god only knows how many air miles you have young man. Whenever you ask a DJ what the worse part of his job is they always say the traveling, the airports, the crap flights, the waiting around…sure only a small price to pay for such an incredible job, but being on tour 52 weeks a year does take a lot of dedication. How do you get through this part of your job?
It makes me laugh when I hear DJs complaining about the traveling part of their job. It’s actually one of my favourite bits. Of course it can be frustrating if you get delayed or whatever but there’s nothing you can do about it so it’s pointless getting too stressed. As for the flying time, airport lounges, etc That’s all “me” time. I can catch up on music, movies, magazines, emails, whatever. I don’t get the concept of “waiting around”. Christ, you can even make music on the go now so I don’t get what it is that’s so bad about that aspect of the job. I just think people need to adjust their mindsets a little. Enjoy it all.

What is the current Top 10 you are spinning…
Conveniently you can see that on Beatport ;)
http://www.beatport.com/charts/dave-seamans-spring-selection-part-two/262059

Who are some of the producers around the world you are giving high fives to at the moment?
There’s loads of people making great music right now. Hot Since 82, Dixon, Sante, Solomun, Butch, Maceo Plex, Robert Babicz, Affkt, Wehbba. I could go on and on.

It’s WMC time yet again in Miami, we’ve already seen an excellent BPM down in Mexico and Pete Tong’s IMS over in Ibiza is shaping up nicely again in May. You will be one of the key speakers at the Brighton Music Conference in a few weeks, at last the UK has something to shout about conference wise. Do you think the UK’s record industry is ready for an event of this calibre just yet – is it getting enough support? We are slowly but surely putting our flag in the sand again as a nation…
Yeah, I find it strange that it hasn’t been done before to be honest. But fair play to John Fleming and his team for taking the leap and making it happen. I’m looking forward to being a part of the first Brighton Conference. It looks to be shaping up nicely. After the collapse of UK clubland post millennium and the shift of power to Berlin as the clubbing epicentre of the World, it seems to have taken a little while for the Uk to find our feet again. But as we talked about earlier, the green shoots of recovery seem to be springing up all over now. You can keep a good man down for long.

The UK club scene too is having a renaissance with towns all over the country finally having notable nights. Where have some of the stand out gigs been for you these past few months?
It’s true. There really are lots of new nights springing up everywhere. I’ve done more UK gigs in the last year than I had in the previous decade! The Rhumba Festival of House in Dundee last October was amazing playing alongside Hot Chip and Derrick Carter. We also did our first Selador party at the Williamson Tunnels in Liverpool which sold out. As did the Tangled gig in Manchester and the Shine show in Leeds. It really does feel like the start of the next big wave in UK clubland which should please all the DJs who moan about airports! ;-)

Where are some of the gigs in your diary around the world you are really looking forward to this summer?
It’s just a little too early to announce a couple of major things I’m going to be doing but let’s just say I won’t be doing Glastonbury this year. I’ve done the last five so felt it was time to take a year off and do a couple of the other UK festivals instead. So watch this space on that. Same goes for Ibiza. I’m just in the process of confirming my Ibiza plans. Should have news in the next couple of weeks. Apart from that, I always enjoy going to South America. I’ll be in Argentina, Brazil, Peru and Mexico over the coming months. Israel was amazing last summer too. So looking forward to going there again. I played to over 30,000 people on the beach just outside Tel Aviv for the legendary Cat & Dog. Incredible!

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And finally, what are the next studio plans for Dave Seaman…?
I’ve just finished a couple of new tracks. One I’ve signed to the New York label, Sullivan Room entitled ‘Distraction Tactics’ and a second called ‘Justified Replacement Of Lulu’ is going to come out on Selador. I’ve also been doing some songwriting again which will come out under a different alias. It’s more downtempo electronica in the vein of Banks and Lorde. And then there’s also a Pet Shop Boys remix due to happen which I’m very excited about. They were the first artists we ever remixed as Brothers in Rhythm so it’s all gone full circle.

http://www.dmcworld.net/features/entry/features/dave-seaman-4

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My interview with Skiddle.com

So you made history recently with the first ever crowd-funded mix compilation, congratulations. Why did you decide to do this and do you see the future of mixes heading this way?


I just wanted to do something different to be honest. I’d done almost 30 mix compilations through traditional channels with the likes of Global Underground & Renaissance and doing another one of those felt a bit “same old, same old”. Taking the Kickstarter option was a out of my comfort zone, a bit of a risk and sometimes you have to do that just to feel alive. And yes I firmly believe that this is going to become an increasingly popular way in which artists and their audiences make things happen. Cutting out the middle man and opening up a direct line of communication between fans and artists can lead to all sorts of interesting possibilities.

We also hear the compilation is now finished and you have started doing the more interesting pledges, such as DJ lessons and private parties. What is the mix like and how much fun have the latter been?

I’m really pleased with the mix. The track list is like a who’s who of everyone who’s hot right now on the underground electronic house scene. It goes from floaty and melodic through tough tech and deep techno to anthemic melancholic stuff. A real cross section of flavours. It’s probably the most mature mix I’ve ever done. And all the parties and DJ lessons thus far have been really good fun. The most random was at the recent Leeds festival where I was part of a competition prize. People had no idea what they were letting themselves in for when they entered so consequently I had some winners who had never see a DJ set up before. Was all good fun though.
The compilation is part of the label Selador, how has that gone for you so far? What’s coming up on the label in the future?

We’ve got off to a flying start. Very happy with how it’s gone so far. The first release by Samu.l reached the higher echelons of Beatport’s Deep House chart and our latest release, the new mixes of paul Rutherford’s Get Real classic have had some of the best feedback across the board i’ve ever seen. It’s all been really positive. Running a label these days is certainly not easy but all this support has given us a real sense of purpose. We’ve got lots more in store for sure including a new EP from one of my favourite production duos right now Piemont, a bumper sampler compilation for ADE and my own new single which is a collaboration with Funkagenda.
So you’re playing a classics set at your hometown of Leeds, looking forward to it? We were there for a similar one at Renaissance in april last year and loved it, how much do you enjoy these occasional trips through memory lane?

 

I can do one or two a year and keep them enjoyable. I think anymore than that and the shine would wear off very quickly. But every once in a while it’s fun to do a bit of crate digging and wheel out some old faves. Especially stuff from the late 80s and early 90s at the moment which all sounds very current again. Things really do round and round in circles.
What other gigs are you looking forward to in the next few weeks?

I’ve got a festival in Moscow and a return to Lithuania where I did my last Global underground CD next. And then as you mentioned I’m in Leeds and then I’m really looking forward to playing alongside Hot Chip, Derrick Carter, DJ Yoda and the likes at the Rhumba Club Festival of house in Dundee in October. That’s always been one of my favourite nights in the UK and they’ve really outdone themselves on the line up this time. That’s definitely gonna be one of my autumn highlights.

 

What music has excited you then this summer?

There’s always so much great music around. It’s so hard to keep on top of it all. My favourite dance track recently has been Yousef & The Angel’s ‘Float Away’ Such a beautiful track. A future classic for sure. I’m also loving what Dixon and Hot Since 82 and Maceo Plex are doing right now. All those boys are on fire. And then outside of dance music, I can’t get enough of the Arctic Monkeys single, Do I Wanna Know? The new Arcade Fire track ‘Reflektor’ is ace too produced by LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy.

And what else is coming up for Dave Seaman?

My next three releases are all collaborations. the first is already out on Pro B Tech which is together with John 00 Fleming called ‘Unexpected item In The Packing Area’ with remixes from Dubspeeka and Hernan Cattaneo & Martin Garcia. Then there’s a track called ‘Feline’ which I did with Guy Mantzur which is coming out on Mihalis Safras’s Playmobil label with a remix from Mihalis himself. And the finally there’s the thing I mentioned before for Selador with Funakgenda. I’m also working on a couple of remixes for a couple of big artists so watch this space ;-)

http://www.skiddle.com/news/all/Dave-Seaman-Interview-Theres-always-so-much-great-music-around/18770/

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My recent interview with 365 Mag

- First of all, congratulations on your successful Kickstarter Mix CD campaign. It’s the very first Mix CD funded solely by fans. Could you tell us why you decided to go for a Kickstarter campaign?

I just wanted to do something different to be honest. I’d done almost 30 mix compilations through traditional channels with the likes of Global Underground & Renaissance and doing another one of those felt a bit “same old, same old”. Taking the Kickstarter option was a out of my comfort zone, a bit of a risk and sometimes you have to do that just to feel alive. I also firmly believe that this is going to become an increasingly popular way in which artists and their audiences make things happen. By cutting out the middle and opening up a direct line of communication between fans and artists, can lead to all sorts of interesting possibilities. 

- After this success, do you think many campaigns will follow?

I don’t see why not. We learnt a lot on our first campaign. And there are definitely things we would do differently next time and other ideas that have since developed. I certainly hope it won’t be my last foray into crowd funding. 

- You’ve said the Mix CD is in a niche market again. Why do you think this is?

Because those days so many more people are downloading their music digitally and as a result physical formats have suffered greatly. But there is still a market for CDs & vinyl. I for one, and I know i’m not alone, still like to buy physical stuff. I’m a collector. I have a library at home with all my vinyl, CDs, DVDs & books. It’s my favourite room. I don’t get that kind of relationship from my hard drive! From disposable files on a computer. And I think that there will always be people who will agree with me. Cloud computing maybe the ultimate in convenience but it’s very soulless. 

- Some people would think a Mix CD is just as easily put together as a DJ set. Could you show us some insight in the process of creating a Mix Compilation? What are the main things you have to deal with?

Maybe for some people it is just like recording a DJ set but for me, I spend weeks and weeks crafting these albums. I want them to be extra special, to stand the test of time and I utilise all the tools available to me to make an album that just wouldn’t be possible to do as a live set. With software programmes like Ableton you can layer upon layer tracks so that they all almost become remixed in the process. For me it’s not just about segueing from one track to the next, it’s about creating a collage of audio that is coherent as one single piece. Also, when you’re doing a live set you don’t have to worry about the licensing process which is another major factor you have to throw into the mix.  

- You’re the founder of the Audio Therapy label and helped found Stress Records. Recently you decided to start up a new label – together with Steve Parry – called Selador Recordings. What do you want to accomplish with Selador?

To put out great music. Plain and simple. I love the process. I didn’t realise how much I’d missed it after closing Audio Therapy a couple of years ago but am so glad to be back in the game. And Steve is the perfect partner. We’ve know each other for such a long time and I think our tastes complement each other. His enthusiasm is infectious too. Which always helps :-)

- How do you select new artists for the label?

There’s no hard or fast rules. We’re always on the look out. The first release on the label from Samu.l came about as he is a friend of my cousin and I heard it as demo over a year ago. The Paul Rutherford ‘Get Real’ release was something that Steve had always wanted to put out as it’s one of his favourite tracks ever. 

- You’ve been the editor at Mixmag from 1988 till 1991 if I’m not mistaken. When was the point in life you decided to leave the music journalism business and focus on a different music career instead? Were you already a DJ before starting at DMC/Mixmag?

Yeah it was just a choice that i had to make as I couldn’t keep doing everything. At least not to the standard I want to do things anyway. If you spread yourself too thinly then something has to give and my DJing and Production careers were starting to take off so it was the journalism that I had to leave behind. I decided I’d much rather be a bird than an ornathologist! :-)

- Got any other big things we should keep our eyes on?

I’ve got quite a lot of productions on the horizon. First up is my new collaboration with John Fleming, the follow up to last years Pixelated, which is called Unexpected Item In The Packing Area. That’s coming out on Pro B Tech with remixes from Hernan Cattaneo & Martin Garcia plus one from Dubspeeka too. Then there’s a new thing I did with Guy Mantzur called ‘Feline’ that’s being released through Mihalis Safras’ Playmobil label with a remix from Mihalis himself. After those look out for collaborations with One Million Toys and Funkagenda which will be both out before the end of the year. I’ve also got a couple of remixes to do soon too. I’ve been busy pretty studio wise this year. 

- Are you a coffee drinker? How do you drink it?

Medium Latte with two sweeteners please :-)

 

Click here to see full article..

http://bit.ly/12rGgr6

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This Is Progressive Interview

Here’s my recent interview with the This Is Progressive website talking dance music journalism, Kickstarter, EDM and the sullying of the Progressive name…..

 

Recently we caught up with one of the most worlds most recognised and respected industry veterans, Dave Seaman, who has since from the 1980’s, earned his credentials playing weddings and birthdays, through to playing to crowds in their tens of thousands around the world. Dave has provided the soundtrack to generations of clubbers, world wide with his unique and honest progressive house sound.

With over 90 releases to his name, owner of new label Selador Recordings, a monthly podcast (Radio Therapy) and a global tour schedule that puts the most seasoned traveller to shame, Dave Seaman is as energetic and passionate about the music industry and the people who see him weekly as he has ever been.

With Mixmag celebrating 30 years – You were the first editor of Mixmag, Where do you see the state of dance music journalism right now? 
I think it’s like the old wild west out there. Hahaha. Basically anyone with an opinion can post up blogs and reviews masquerading as journalism these days and so finding the quality stuff amidst all the noise is increasingly difficult. When I was a teenager, the only source of information i had fro dance music was James Hamilton’s 2 pages in Record Mirror every week and now it’s just information overload. Crazy. I think places that people trust on line to give them the quality they’re looking for will be come increasingly important. We’re really still just at the beginning of this digital revolution and still finding our feet.

I see you played in Israel at Arcadia beach to over 25 000 people, one if the biggest crowds you have experienced, how was it?
Amazing. Quite a buzz I’ll tell you. There were people for as far as the eye could see. A real spectacle. Just a shame that police felt they couldn’t control it so shut us down early.

You have always nurtured younger talent, whether it be taking them on tour, putting them on your label, etc. Do you feel a responsibility to help out as a mentor?
I don’t necessarily feel responsible but it’s something I enjoy doing. It’s nice to be able to pass on a little wisdom and knowledge and open a few doors if possible. People did it for me and so I think I should do tyne same for others. Do as you would be done to and all that.

Where do you see the dance music world going right now?
I really don’t analyse the scene like that. That’s your job! You’re the journalists. Hahaha. I’ve been doing this too long to get bogged down in all that stuff. I’ll leave all that to the ornithologists while I just carry on life being a bird ;-) Basically, it all goes round in circles and will be here forever and a day.

You recently entered the world of kickstarter funding for your mix cd. How did this come about and what has the experience been like?
I’d been asked to do another Renaissance Masters but it really felt like I was repeating myself and I could tell that for everyone around me there was a general ambivalence towards it so when my agent Sara suggested Doing a crowd funding project it just felt fresh and different. I think the fact that it was a risk made it so exciting and it had never been done before, a crowd funded DJ mix compilation, so there was an instant attraction. I’m still a bit overwhelmed that we managed to pull it off and with so much time to spare. It’s definitely something I’d consider doing again sometime and something that I think a lot of other DJs might consider now.

How do you prepare for a mix album? It must take a lot planning. Where does one start? First of all you just throw the net out as far and wide as possible to get as much new music as possible. Then you sift through the catch and pick out all the goodies. Then you try to license everything that you might want on the album and finally mix together what you have cleared to use. It’s a long process. A 3 month job a t least. A painstaking but ultimately very rewarding labour of love.

Much has been said about the US and EDM market, how has this affected your more underground sound?
It doesn’t really bother me too much. There’s always been an overground and an overground and they need each other to exist and to keep the world turning. It does annoy me how much that scene is driven by money rather than music though. It’ll have it’s day and then will pass as soon as there’s something else for the corporate vultures to get their teeth into.

The name progressive has been tarnished and mismatched over the years. What is your view?
I never bothered for a long time but now I must admit it irks me a bit. What people call progressive house these days is not progressive, it’s cheesy pop music that used to be Euro Dance in the late 80s/ early 90s. Real progressive house was an underground thing. But it’s the same for most genres. What people call Deep House now and what people call Techno now are not what I understand those genres to be. It’s all a mess. The lines between all the genres have become so blurred that none of them make sense anymore. But I don’t see a solution to be honest. They’re a necessary evil, genres. We have to divide the music up somehow otherwise it would be impossible to know where to start with the 10,000 tracks a week coming out on Beatport!

What advice do you have for up and coming DJs? 
Work hard, be humble and stick to your guns.

Lastly, anything exciting you can share with us for 2013?
Well, the Kickstarter CD is my main project but I have a lot of collaborative productions coming out too. I did a track with Guy Mantzur called Feline which is coming out on Mihalis Safras’ Playmobil label, a track with John Fleming which is coming out on Pro B Tech with remixes from Hernan Cattaneo and Martin Garcia & Dubspeeka and I’ve also just finished a track with Funkagenda which has been huge for me in my sets. And there’s plenty more where they all came from too. I’m making a point of getting into the studio a lot more this year. Watch this space.

http://thisisprogressive.com/website/news/dave_seaman_interview.html

 

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A transcript (& link) of my recent interview with DJ Mag

DJ Mag logoYou’ve had a long-term association with Renaissance – why do you think it has endured for so long as a respected club brand?

“Renaissance has always stood for quality and they haven’t been fickle followers of fashion by jumping on every new trend that comes along. They do what they do and they’re the best at it. More people should concentrate on their own thing and just play to their strengths rather than worrying about what everybody else is doing.”

Why do you think you have endured so long as an international DJ?

“See above! Ha ha ha. I’ve followed a similar ideology. Of course you progress and evolve as the scene changes around you but I like to think I keep the same principles and not forget where I came from and as I’m still here 25 years later, I must be doing something right!”

How did you approach this latest Renaissance Masters mix?

“I don’t worry so much about every track being a brand new and exclusive these days. It’s all about the quality. Within a few months it will all be old anyway! I find some people’s unquenchable desire for new stuff all the time quite sad really. The minute something becomes available, they discard it. However brilliant it may be. But there are some exclusives on there, yes, and pretty much all the stuff that is out already has been edited or enhanced in some way to make it unique to the album.”

In Dom Phillips’ book Superstar DJs, you talked a bit about some of your demons. Where’s your head at now?

“Yeah, I had some pretty dark periods around the turn of the Millennium, largely down to living a life of excess and not having much of an anchor. But I got married in 2005 and now have two young boys, so my perspective has changed dramatically. I remember reading somewhere that adults might make babies but really it’s babies that make adults, and I can really relate to that.

“Now I take the last plane out on a Friday and the first flight back on a Sunday morning, even if it’s Asia or South America I’m playing, just so I can get back to spend time with the family. I even went to Australia for the weekend at the beginning of the year, although that was stretching it a bit.”

Have you ever wanted to do something as obviously commercial as your early ‘90s Brothers In Rhythm stuff?

“I would love to do some more pop stuff again but it’s all a question of time. As I just said, I want to spend as much time with my family as possible and just keeping up with the demands of being a DJ these days is so time-consuming with the amount of music being released and the advent of social media. It doesn’t leave much time for the studio, but it is on my ‘to do’ list and I will get round to it sooner or later.”

http://www.djmag.com/news/detail/3079

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My interview with DJ Download

DJ Download logoWhat have been up to lately and what can we expect from you over the next couple of months?I’ve just finished my latest mix compilation for Renaissance. It’s my 28th mix comp so I like to think I’ve got the hang of it now. So I’m going to be touring here there and everywhere to promote that right through to early 2012. In between that, we’ve just moved house. The third time in 2 years! But this time it’s for good I swear. It could fall down around me and I’ll be going nowhere!

What do you think about dj mag’s top100 poll? I think it turned into a load of old commercial lowest common denominator codswallop. This opinion coincidentally started to form around the very same time that I no longer found myself in it! hahaha

What’s the first record you bought? I bought Queen’s ‘We Are The Champions’ with ‘We Will Rock You’ on the other side for 79p from Woolworths.

Are you afraid of piracy? Only if they made me walk the plank ;-)

Define yourself in 3 words- Taurus, Virgo rising

Are you obsessed about anything? I’m a little bit excessive when it comes to the Japanese clothing & lifestyle brand A Bathing Ape. I’ve been collecting their stuff for over 10 years now and have everything from the bathmat to the underwear. It they’d made a kitchen sink, I’d have it in every colour!

What’s the most ridiculous promotional thing you’ve done? Top Of The Pops is up there. I did it with Heaven 17 when our Brothers In Rhythm mix of ‘Temptation’ went Top Ten. Standing there in the background miming along badly to a bassline for 3 minutes was pretty ridiculous in hindsight although at the time, it seemed like the pinnacle of chart success.

What are the current top five most listened to tracks/songs on your iPod? Lana Del Rey ‘Video Games’, Bombay Bicycle Club ‘Shuffle’, Massive Attack Vs. Burial ‘ Four Walls’ , Chilly Gonzales ‘Crying’, Everything Everything ‘Final Form’

What is your favourite TV show? Breaking Bad

What would your super hero super power be? Oh to fly definitely. I’d save a fortune getting to gigs!

If you ever walk around the house in pants and slippers and what do you listen to? Usually BBC6 Music. It was a revelation when I finally got round to buying a DAB radio and I discovered 6 Music. I love Shawn Keaveney in a morning and Mark Radcliffe & Stuart Maconie’s show is the best on the airwaves. I couldn’t produce a finer radio station if I did it myself!

If you could live anywhere in the world where would it be?  Australia without doubt. They’ve just got everything right as far he pace and quality of life but yet it’s still a hotbed of creativity and for an Englishman, full of home comforts. It’s just so far away for me to travel around the world DJing every weekend otherwise I’d be there in a shot.

What was your last thought? God , these questions are random. I like random :-)

http://www.djdownload.com/earworm/2011/11/02/a-little-randomness-with-dave-seaman/

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My recent interview with Data Transmission

Data Trasmission logoQ. 20 years ago you were working as a journalist for Mixmag, at a time when the only way to receive that kind of information really was through radio, V and print. Since then the internet has come along; just from information stance how has how much we know about music changed?

A. I don’t think we’ve truly grasped yet just how much the internet has changed everything. Not just music. And I think we’re still only at the early stages of the digital revolution. Back when I was in charge of Mixmag, we didn’t even put the magazine together on a computer. I used to cut and paste with a scalpel and glue to make up the template from which the printer then made the magazine. Imagine that! Nowadays, there’s no air of mystique to music anymore. Everybody has access to the same information literally at their fingertips. It’s made for an instant gratification culture. And I don’t think that’s necessarily a good thing.

Q. And whilst we’re on the matter, the music itself? There’s definitely more of it available, and the barriers of entry are lower. But is this a good thing?

A. No. The combination of diminishing expectations and lack of any quality control has turned into real burden for the scene. Everything is so disposable now. We drowning in a sea of so much stuff lacking in either imagination or technical ability or even worse, both! There is still good music out there of course but you have to be an excavation expert with immeasurable patience to find it!

Q. Where do you see the format of mix compilation going? As someone who has been at the forefront of the glory years of its previous days, both with Renaissance and Global underground, where does the modern compilation sit now?

A. For me it doesn’t change, a compilation should still be much more than just a bunch of tracks segued together. It should be an audio collage. A piece of art that will last for years. I spend weeks crafting my albums and although nothing like the glory years of the nineties, still do good numbers. How long the physical format of the CD will last remains to be seen but I’d still approach it the same way if it were to go digital only.

Q. Tell us about your new Masters compilation. How pleased are you to be working with renaissance again and can you describe what you’ve tried to achieve with the release?

A. It’s so good to have them back. For a while there was a big Renaissance sized hole in clubland. And it’s fitting that they’re back up and running in time to celebrate their 20th anniversary next year. As for the album, like I just said, there was a lot of care and attention to detail went into making it. It had to be something that which captured where I’m at in 2011 but will stand the test of time and which is befitting of the Renaissance brand. I hope all that has been realised.

Q. And you’re playing a launch party in Shoreditch for the album at the Village Underground. What can we expect from the gig and your set?

A. I shall be attempting to seamlessly segue from one track to the next without the aid of a safety net whilst simultaneously creating a atmosphere of enlightened rapture on the dance floor ;-)

Q. Henry Saiz is playing alongside you. Are you a fan of his music?

A. A big fan yes. I thought his Balance compilation was fantastic and we played together with great success earlier this year in Buenos Aires. He’s one of the most exciting new DJ/Producers out there.

Q. Speaking of fans, we’ve also heard you’re a follower of Leeds United, a shared curse! How has their topsy-turvy trajectory dovetailed with your DJing career?

A. I’d never really thought about it but I suppose you could draw some parallels between what was going on in clubland at the turn of the millennium and Leeds United’s own trajectory. A period of success that turned into excess that culminated in a spectacular fall from grace. Just like Leeds though, we’re rebuilding for the future and things are looking up! :-)

Q. And finally, dream situation time. You can go back to any period in clubland history, and play at any club. Who would you have playing alongside you and what record would you drop that would define the evening? Or have you been lucky enough to have had this moment properly?

A. It would have to be at the Hacienda in 1988 but with Fabric’s current sound system playing alongside Graeme Park & Sasha and I’d drop ‘I Feel Love’ by Donna Summer for the very first time ever in a club having had a Back To The Future moment and gone back and stolen it from 1977!! Orgasmic :-)

http://www.datatransmission.co.uk/Features/974/3/

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