Best Singles of 2013

Next up in my personal end of year round up are my favourite singles of 2013. In the words of Hot Chocolate, Everyone’s a winner! Just my favourite films left to go :-)

1. Arcade Fire ‘Reflektor’

2. Arctic Monkeys ‘Do I Wanna Know?’

3. James Blake ‘Retrograde’

4. David Bowie ‘Love Is Lost (James Murphy mix)’

5. Lulu James ‘Closer’

6. Disclosure feat. Aluna George ‘White Noise’

7. Jai Paul ‘Jasmine’

8. Yeah Yeah Yeahs ‘Sacrilege’

9. Lordes ‘Royals’

10. Hot Chip ‘Dark & Stormy’

 

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Best Club Tracks of 2013

Continuing my end of year round up, we continue with my favourite club tracks of the year. The ten best dance floor destroyers of the last twelve months. As you can see, there is one glaring recurring theme, what a year it’s been for Hot Since 82!

1. Tiga Vs. Audion ‘Let’s Go Dancing’ (Solomun remix)

2. Foals ‘Late Night’ (Sasha remix)

3. TV Baby New York Is Alright’ (Maetrik remix)

4. Green Velvet ‘Bigger Than Prince’ (Hot Since 82 remix)

5. Rudimental ‘Right Here’ (Hot Since 82 remix)

6. Mano Le Tough ‘Everything You’ve Done Before’ (Dixon remix)

7. Yousef & The Angel ‘Float Away’

8. Maxxi Soundsystem ‘Stella’s Way’

9. Paul Woolford ‘Untitled’

10. Shadow Child ‘So High’ (Hot Since 82 remix)

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My remix for Tribal Pulse out now

tribal pulse dave seaman backMy remix for the Scottish imprint Tribal Pulse is now out and about for your delectation. It’s called ‘Tokyo Skyline’, it’s by Boom Merchant (aka label boss Kyle Thompson) and is a brooding slice of deep techy boom boom business guaranteed to get you in the mood. Already getting props from the likes of Wehbba, Nick Warren, SiS, Leon, Guy Mantzur, Agent! and many more, do yourself a favour and grab yourself a little something to make Xmas go with that extra swing. ‘Cos your worth it. Enjoy :-)

http://www.beatport.com/release/tokyo-skyline-ep/1203643

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Best Albums of 2013

Unbelievably, it’s that time again, here’s my customary end of year charts. 2013 seemed to pass in a flash but not without plenty of memorable moments. Here’s a few of my favourites starting with the best albums of the year. You probably know quite a few of them already but if you don’t they all come highly recommended. It’s good to share ;-) Merry Xmas a happy New Year to you all. Dave

1. Foals ‘Holy Fire’

2. Arcade Fire ‘Reflektor’

3. The National Trouble Will Find Me’

4. Arctic Monkeys ‘AM’

5. Cloud Boat ‘Book Of Hours’

6. !!! ‘Thr!!!er

7. Moderat ‘II’

8. Jon Hopkins ‘Immunity’

9. London Grammar ‘If You Want’

10. Daughter ‘If You Leave’

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Radio Therapy Broadcast – October 2013

Listen again and download my latest radio show which premieres every third Tuesday of the month at frisky.fm

Spread the word. Enjoy! :-)

Tracklist as follows..

1. John Digweed & Nick Muir Vs. Jozif  ‘Groove Del Velrano’ [Bedrock]

2. Booka Shade ‘Love Inc’ [Blaufield]

3. Kucna Muzika ‘Feel It’ [Selador]

4. Chris Fortier ‘Music Makes The Body’ [Selador]

5. Rob Hes & Steve Slight ‘Focusing’ [Selador]

6. Deetron Feat. Ben Westbeech ‘Rhythm’ (Instrumental) [Music man]

7. Lulu James ‘Closer’ (Seduce & Destroy dub) [Black Butter]

8. Adam Beyer & Ida Engberg ‘You Know’ [Truesoul]

9. Ruttenbergs ‘Heating’ [Parquet]

10. Oliver Huntemann ‘Schatten’ [Ideal]

11. Agoria ‘Scala’ [Innervisions]

12. Solomun Grey ‘Gen V’ [Black Butter]

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My latest Top Ten for Beatport

Screen Shot 2013-10-28 at 18.13.46

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Coyu & Edu Imbernon ‘The Storm’ (Daniel Dexter mix) [Suara]

2. Dave Seaman & Guy Mantzur ‘Feline’ [Playmobil]

3. Maceo Plex, Maars & Florence Bird ‘Going Back’ (Dub) [Ellum]

4. Chris Fortier ‘Music Makes The Body’ [Selador]

5. Sidney Charles ‘Morning Glory’ [8 Bit]

6. Booka Shade ‘Love Inc’ (Butch mix) [Blaufield]

7. Robert Babicz ‘Rosegarden’ [Selador]

8. Piemont ‘Been Around’ [Selador]

9. Sante ‘Need This’ [Objektivity]

10. Seff ‘Visions’ [Selador]

http://www.beatport.com/charts/dave-seamans-halloween-monsters/225080

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My recent interview with colorising.com

1. Before house music landed in the UK, you were spinning various records of multiple genres. Do you remember the very first house record that you heard and what were your immediate thoughts on it? Did you know right away that you had to be a part of this new, emerging sound?
I do remember yes. I’d been into the Electro and Soul scenes for quite a while by then so was following James Hamilton’s dance music pages in Record Mirror religiously so I knew of this new “House Music” that was coming from Chicago but it wasn’t until I was at Roof Top Gardens/ Casanovas in Wakefield one weekend that I heard Steve ‘Silk’ Hurley’s ‘Jack Your Body for the first time. It blew my mind. It was so different to anything else that it really stood out and I immediately went off to search for more. Marshall Jefferson’s ‘Move Your Body’, JM Silk’s ‘Love Can’t Turn Around’ and The House Master Boyz ‘House Nation’ all arrived at around the same time. It was pretty obvious that this was the start of something exciting. I couldn’t get enough.

2. You were also attending many of the early raves during the house explosion. Those parties were quite cavalier in a sense. Part of the excitement was trying to determine the location and playing this “cat and mouse” game. How would you contrast those early raves to the festivals that are happening today?
The early Rave scene was subversive and underground. It was completely new and because of the illegality of the parties had an element of danger. Festivals nowadays are very much a part of the fabric of modern day culture. There’s nothing subversive about them. Latitude (or Latte-tude as it gets called) is particularly family friendly and as middle class as it gets. There’s a great book I can recommend about the Acid House explosion by Matthew Colin called Altered States. It really gives you a great insight to the madness of those halcyon days.

3. Many people know about the infamous Mixmag competition that you won when you were DJing early on, but what initially led you to becoming the editor at the magazine?
I was initially just doing reviews for Mixmag and maybe the odd interview but when the then Editor left hastily I was catapulted into the deep end. I ended up covering for him whilst a replacement was found but after managing to pull two issues together myself the powers that be just said, we’ve not found anybody that we’d rather do it than you so you might as well carry on. I had gotten my English O level but really had no journalistic experience so it was sheer enthusiasm and passion that got me through. I was living and breathing the scene though and I was very much right time, right place. Right in the eye of the storm as it were. As I arrived at Mixmag- M/A/R/R/S, S Express, Coldcut and Bomb The Bass had all just hit the top of the pop charts. DJ Culture as we know it had just begun.

4. With the advent of technology, music has become extremely accessible and the lines of genre are increasingly getting blurred. As an industry expert who has been in key positions such as DJ, producer, editor and label boss, do you think music is still at a healthy point creatively?
Undoubtedly. There is always fantastic, creative music being made but with so much music being made and as you say with almost everything being instantly available to everyone, it’s not as valued as it used to be. MP3s are such a disposable medium. So cheap and replaceable, they have no real worth. And so in that sense it’s not healthy. Cheap and disposable is not good. The real problem though is quantity over quality. There’s just too much music being made with no filter system in place like record companies used to provide in the past. Imagine if everyone who thought they could cook were allowed to put their product on the shelves of a supermarket. It would take you a week just to get past the cereals!

5. I have read that growing up you constantly listened to the radio. Going back to the topic of technology, people have gone on to use the medium of the internet to produce their own shows and podcasts. On one hand, it’s liberating to have the ability to broadcast music, however, does this slowly eliminate the idea of the taste maker, similar to what we used to have on radio?
To a certain extent. You could argue it takes the power out of the hands of a few and spreads it around a bit more but at the end of the day you’re only a tastemaker if you have an audience and the people with real influence still have a lot more listeners than your average podcast.

6.From working at Mixmag to producing Top 20 hits such as Brothers in Rhythm’s “Such a Good Feeling”, on down to working with acts like the Pet Shop Boys and David Bowie, you have had a continual train of success. Are there ever times when you have had to step back and really take it all in?
Ha! Not really. I’ve always been all about the present and immediate future. Maybe one day I’ll get round to writing it all down though. I probably do have a pretty good story to tell :-)

7. More claims to fame are your labels Stress Records and Audio Therapy, which included releases by a slew of top acts in the scene. You now run Selador Recordings with Steve Parry. What prompted you to start a new label?
It’s all Steve’s fault. I blame him! hahaha. It was following a conversation we had where he expressed a long time ambition to run a label that got me thinking. I had been out of the game for a couple of years after Audio Therapy and didn’t realise how much I’d missed it until we spoke further about the idea of Selador and that buzz very quickly returned. It’s a labour of love. It’s not really profitable in monetary terms but you get so much out of it in other ways and I just love the process. It’s a great way to collaborate with like minded artists and put your flag in the sand.

8.You have the new “Selador Sessions Vol. 1” mix compilation out right now which was funded by the people through Kickstarter. I think this speaks volumes in terms of the support from those who love house music. Do you envision this process to soon be the wave of the future for releases?
I hope so and can’t see any reason why not. It’s a fascinating development and actually more of a throwback to the way things used to get done before capitalism took over the world. This idea of a communal project. And now with the advance of social media it’s so much easier for artists to be able to get together with their audience to make creative projects happen. It’s a win win situation really.

9.Finally, what projects are coming down the pipeline at Selador?
Our next release is a compilation to coincide with the Amsterdam Dance Event this month which features a lot of the artists that have already featured on the label and a few more besides. Then there’ll be a new single from myself together with Funkagenda called ‘Naughty Forest’ which has been a staple in my sets for the last few months and also features on Selador Sessions Volume 1. And then who knows, there’s even talk that Mr Parry will be getting back into the studio although I’ll believe it when I see it! :-)

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Dave Seaman & Guy Mantzur ‘Feline’ Out now on Playmobil

playmobil037I’m very pleased to say my new collaboration with Tel Aviv DJ & Producer Guy Mantzur entitled ‘Feline’ is finally out for you to purchase through Mihalis Safras’ esteemed Playmobil imprint. The follow up to last year’s ‘K9′, this has been a weapon in my sets for the whole summer period. And as if that isn’t recommendation enough, it now comes with a stomping remix from Mihalis himself to complete a top notch package. So don’t delay, get yours, right here…

http://www.beatport.com/release/feline/1086989

 

 

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My interview with Skiddle.com

So you made history recently with the first ever crowd-funded mix compilation, congratulations. Why did you decide to do this and do you see the future of mixes heading this way?


I just wanted to do something different to be honest. I’d done almost 30 mix compilations through traditional channels with the likes of Global Underground & Renaissance and doing another one of those felt a bit “same old, same old”. Taking the Kickstarter option was a out of my comfort zone, a bit of a risk and sometimes you have to do that just to feel alive. And yes I firmly believe that this is going to become an increasingly popular way in which artists and their audiences make things happen. Cutting out the middle man and opening up a direct line of communication between fans and artists can lead to all sorts of interesting possibilities.

We also hear the compilation is now finished and you have started doing the more interesting pledges, such as DJ lessons and private parties. What is the mix like and how much fun have the latter been?

I’m really pleased with the mix. The track list is like a who’s who of everyone who’s hot right now on the underground electronic house scene. It goes from floaty and melodic through tough tech and deep techno to anthemic melancholic stuff. A real cross section of flavours. It’s probably the most mature mix I’ve ever done. And all the parties and DJ lessons thus far have been really good fun. The most random was at the recent Leeds festival where I was part of a competition prize. People had no idea what they were letting themselves in for when they entered so consequently I had some winners who had never see a DJ set up before. Was all good fun though.
The compilation is part of the label Selador, how has that gone for you so far? What’s coming up on the label in the future?

We’ve got off to a flying start. Very happy with how it’s gone so far. The first release by Samu.l reached the higher echelons of Beatport’s Deep House chart and our latest release, the new mixes of paul Rutherford’s Get Real classic have had some of the best feedback across the board i’ve ever seen. It’s all been really positive. Running a label these days is certainly not easy but all this support has given us a real sense of purpose. We’ve got lots more in store for sure including a new EP from one of my favourite production duos right now Piemont, a bumper sampler compilation for ADE and my own new single which is a collaboration with Funkagenda.
So you’re playing a classics set at your hometown of Leeds, looking forward to it? We were there for a similar one at Renaissance in april last year and loved it, how much do you enjoy these occasional trips through memory lane?

 

I can do one or two a year and keep them enjoyable. I think anymore than that and the shine would wear off very quickly. But every once in a while it’s fun to do a bit of crate digging and wheel out some old faves. Especially stuff from the late 80s and early 90s at the moment which all sounds very current again. Things really do round and round in circles.
What other gigs are you looking forward to in the next few weeks?

I’ve got a festival in Moscow and a return to Lithuania where I did my last Global underground CD next. And then as you mentioned I’m in Leeds and then I’m really looking forward to playing alongside Hot Chip, Derrick Carter, DJ Yoda and the likes at the Rhumba Club Festival of house in Dundee in October. That’s always been one of my favourite nights in the UK and they’ve really outdone themselves on the line up this time. That’s definitely gonna be one of my autumn highlights.

 

What music has excited you then this summer?

There’s always so much great music around. It’s so hard to keep on top of it all. My favourite dance track recently has been Yousef & The Angel’s ‘Float Away’ Such a beautiful track. A future classic for sure. I’m also loving what Dixon and Hot Since 82 and Maceo Plex are doing right now. All those boys are on fire. And then outside of dance music, I can’t get enough of the Arctic Monkeys single, Do I Wanna Know? The new Arcade Fire track ‘Reflektor’ is ace too produced by LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy.

And what else is coming up for Dave Seaman?

My next three releases are all collaborations. the first is already out on Pro B Tech which is together with John 00 Fleming called ‘Unexpected item In The Packing Area’ with remixes from Dubspeeka and Hernan Cattaneo & Martin Garcia. Then there’s a track called ‘Feline’ which I did with Guy Mantzur which is coming out on Mihalis Safras’s Playmobil label with a remix from Mihalis himself. And the finally there’s the thing I mentioned before for Selador with Funakgenda. I’m also working on a couple of remixes for a couple of big artists so watch this space ;-)

http://www.skiddle.com/news/all/Dave-Seaman-Interview-Theres-always-so-much-great-music-around/18770/

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My recent interview with 365 Mag

- First of all, congratulations on your successful Kickstarter Mix CD campaign. It’s the very first Mix CD funded solely by fans. Could you tell us why you decided to go for a Kickstarter campaign?

I just wanted to do something different to be honest. I’d done almost 30 mix compilations through traditional channels with the likes of Global Underground & Renaissance and doing another one of those felt a bit “same old, same old”. Taking the Kickstarter option was a out of my comfort zone, a bit of a risk and sometimes you have to do that just to feel alive. I also firmly believe that this is going to become an increasingly popular way in which artists and their audiences make things happen. By cutting out the middle and opening up a direct line of communication between fans and artists, can lead to all sorts of interesting possibilities. 

- After this success, do you think many campaigns will follow?

I don’t see why not. We learnt a lot on our first campaign. And there are definitely things we would do differently next time and other ideas that have since developed. I certainly hope it won’t be my last foray into crowd funding. 

- You’ve said the Mix CD is in a niche market again. Why do you think this is?

Because those days so many more people are downloading their music digitally and as a result physical formats have suffered greatly. But there is still a market for CDs & vinyl. I for one, and I know i’m not alone, still like to buy physical stuff. I’m a collector. I have a library at home with all my vinyl, CDs, DVDs & books. It’s my favourite room. I don’t get that kind of relationship from my hard drive! From disposable files on a computer. And I think that there will always be people who will agree with me. Cloud computing maybe the ultimate in convenience but it’s very soulless. 

- Some people would think a Mix CD is just as easily put together as a DJ set. Could you show us some insight in the process of creating a Mix Compilation? What are the main things you have to deal with?

Maybe for some people it is just like recording a DJ set but for me, I spend weeks and weeks crafting these albums. I want them to be extra special, to stand the test of time and I utilise all the tools available to me to make an album that just wouldn’t be possible to do as a live set. With software programmes like Ableton you can layer upon layer tracks so that they all almost become remixed in the process. For me it’s not just about segueing from one track to the next, it’s about creating a collage of audio that is coherent as one single piece. Also, when you’re doing a live set you don’t have to worry about the licensing process which is another major factor you have to throw into the mix.  

- You’re the founder of the Audio Therapy label and helped found Stress Records. Recently you decided to start up a new label – together with Steve Parry – called Selador Recordings. What do you want to accomplish with Selador?

To put out great music. Plain and simple. I love the process. I didn’t realise how much I’d missed it after closing Audio Therapy a couple of years ago but am so glad to be back in the game. And Steve is the perfect partner. We’ve know each other for such a long time and I think our tastes complement each other. His enthusiasm is infectious too. Which always helps :-)

- How do you select new artists for the label?

There’s no hard or fast rules. We’re always on the look out. The first release on the label from Samu.l came about as he is a friend of my cousin and I heard it as demo over a year ago. The Paul Rutherford ‘Get Real’ release was something that Steve had always wanted to put out as it’s one of his favourite tracks ever. 

- You’ve been the editor at Mixmag from 1988 till 1991 if I’m not mistaken. When was the point in life you decided to leave the music journalism business and focus on a different music career instead? Were you already a DJ before starting at DMC/Mixmag?

Yeah it was just a choice that i had to make as I couldn’t keep doing everything. At least not to the standard I want to do things anyway. If you spread yourself too thinly then something has to give and my DJing and Production careers were starting to take off so it was the journalism that I had to leave behind. I decided I’d much rather be a bird than an ornathologist! :-)

- Got any other big things we should keep our eyes on?

I’ve got quite a lot of productions on the horizon. First up is my new collaboration with John Fleming, the follow up to last years Pixelated, which is called Unexpected Item In The Packing Area. That’s coming out on Pro B Tech with remixes from Hernan Cattaneo & Martin Garcia plus one from Dubspeeka too. Then there’s a new thing I did with Guy Mantzur called ‘Feline’ that’s being released through Mihalis Safras’ Playmobil label with a remix from Mihalis himself. After those look out for collaborations with One Million Toys and Funkagenda which will be both out before the end of the year. I’ve also got a couple of remixes to do soon too. I’ve been busy pretty studio wise this year. 

- Are you a coffee drinker? How do you drink it?

Medium Latte with two sweeteners please :-)

 

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